Little known chapter in American history

Few Americans understand the scope of racial injustice in this country better than Muhammad Ali Muhammad, Muhammad Ali’s younger brother. At only 20, the charismatic, self-assured young man was sowed to the heartbreak of the civil rights movement after Malcolm X accused him of being Malcolm X’s murderer. Now, as he turns 60, the young man, briefly imprisoned for his brother’s murder, is fighting to clear his name. A story of coming to terms with injustice, forgiveness and – most recently – forgiving the killer who killed one of his heroes.

Halim Ali is a Muslim-American who came to the US from the United Kingdom with his family at age 2. But they spent the next two decades forced to dodge arrest, usually with his sisters at the forefront. At 13, Halim’s sister, Malaika Halim-Walker, joined the civil rights movement as the young followers of Malcolm X led demonstrations and campaigns for free and fair elections. With limited English, he found himself targeted by police as a potential affiliate of black power groups, only able to protect himself by hiding in a closet and whispering his intelligence to his sisters.

In 1964, the activist Malcolm X found him at school. Zaid Shakir, a friend who would eventually co-found Rapido, a hip-hop label that produced a record for Muhammad Ali, recounts the political moment: “Malcolm X asked, ‘Why do you keep you down?’ Muhammad Ali had the biggest smile on his face. He said, ‘What you going to do when you grow up?’” Muhammad Ali was shocked and defiant, telling Malcolm X that if he could not prove himself by the age of 21, he would stay in the UK and continue his studies. Malcolm X told him it was an insult and delivered a punch to the face.

Malcolm X’s brother Islam beheaded a man on the night of November 21, 1965. When a picture of Muhammad Ali with the confessed murderer, Mujahid Halim, surfaced, Ali forgave his brother. But, it wasn’t the first time Muhammad Ali knew about the murder. Two months earlier, shortly after the incident, Ali told his people that the accused murderer had confessed to his murder in an attempt to seize power and power. In any case, that would be the legal end of the murder, as Malcolm X died months before prosecutors were able to question Muhammad Ali.

This article was first published in November 1997. The @NYT asked Muhammad Ali if he still held Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s Half Brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’s half brother, Muhammad Ali’

Leave a Comment